Smoking cigarettes could aggravate knee pain


September 28, 2012

Topic: featured articles

Those suffering from knee pain after surgery would be wise to stop smoking, according to a recent study.

Those suffering from knee pain after surgery would be wise to stop smoking, according to a recent study. It seems that those who persist in the practice post-operatively have a harder time healing, making other complications more likely as well.

Orthopaedics researchers at the Ohio State University in Columbus discovered that connective tissue was damaged greatly by smoking cigarettes. This information comes as a culmination of the review of 14 different medical studies, more than half of which focused specifically on knee and total joint replacement patients.

The American Journal of Sports Medicine wrote that ligaments and other muscle tissues, not just those of the knee, were adversely affected by the use of tobacco products. Clinicians and patients have been aware for some time that smoking is bad for the cardiovascular system as well as other wellness factors, but perhaps those with knee pain and other injuries will now think harder about quitting in light of this new research.

When it comes to older patients, the risk factors associated with total joint replacements are already high enough. People over 65 are more likely to need these procedures, according to The Journal Times, as their bodies start to break down naturally. Adding more strain, like smoking cigarettes, could make it even harder to recover.


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